Marketing Excellence: Philips

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Founded in 1891, Royal Philips Electronics is one of the largest electronics companies in the world and one of the most respected companies. Anton and Gerard Phillips left Phillips & Co.; started to produce carbon filament lamps in Eindhoven, the Netherlands in 1891. Eventually, their company became a global company and today employs 116,000 people worldwide

 A market leader in medical diagnostic imaging, patient care systems, energy-efficient lighting solutions, personal wellness and lifestyle solutions, Philips manufactures more than 50,000 products in 100 countries, including sales, service and retail In 2014, the company had sales of approximately $30.97 billion. It provides products and support in 100 countries and 35 languages. With the global reach of its manufacturing facilities in many locations, Philips needs to develop a boundary less approach to brand management to strengthen its reputation as a global brand.

The company has tried several different ways to do this. The Philips logo originated when Anton Phillips used the initials of Phillips and Co as the company logo. The word Phillips also appeared on the lenses of its steel tube lamps In 1898, placards featuring various Dutch national costumes were used as a tool a traded, where of each card The word Phillips letters are printed on the series of bulbs above In 1926, Phillips introduced a symbol featuring waves and stars. The waves symbolized radio waves, and the stars represented the evening sky through which those radio waves travelled.

In the 1930s, the waves and stars were placed in a circle as part of the design. To avoid legal problems with known owners of circular marks and to secure a distinctive trademark for Philips, the company eventually developed a shield with circles and word marks, which they have gone on have been used since the 1930s but differ in products and marketing and advertising. Between 1930 and 1995, all advertising and marketing campaigns were conducted at the production level, in the local market. Therefore, the company ran several marketing campaigns at once, without allowing the company’s representatives worldwide.

Between 1970 and 1995, Philips also faced stiff competition from Japanese electronics companies that reduced its market share. With large automated machinery, Japanese companies were able to enter the market with low-cost consumer electronics. Philips therefore had to close its unprofitable factories and begin building larger and more efficient buildings. The company also closed operations in the defence and home appliance segments that were not directly related to its core business. To cut costs, it began sharing its R&D costs with other large companies such as AT&T and Siemens AG. Philips has always been known for its technology and its ability to innovate. He is credited with introducing innovations such as the radio, the audio cassette, the video cassette recorder (VCR), the compact disc (CD), the digital video disc (DVD).

But simply being able to use technology in new ways and new ways wasn’t enough for the company. It wanted to be a global brand and support the idea that technology would improve people’s lives. To this end, Philips launched a new branding called “Let’s make things better”, which emphasized improving people’s lives through technological solutions. The company launched the campaign globally in all markets and linked the campaign to all its products. It also united the entire company, gave employees a sense of belonging, and unified the company for an external audience. The main goal of the campaign was to help Philips connect with people, and it succeeded in this endeavour. Between 1970 and 1995, Philips also faced stiff competition from Japanese electronics companies that reduced its market share. With large automated machinery, Japanese companies were able to enter the market with low-cost consumer electronics. Philips therefore had to close its unprofitable factories and start building larger and more efficient buildings. The company also closed operations in the defence and home appliance segments that were not directly related to its core business. To cut costs, it began sharing its R&D costs with other large companies such as AT&T and Siemens AG. Philips has always been known for its technology and its ability to innovate. He is credited with introducing innovations such as the radio, the audio cassette, the video cassette recorder (VCR), the compact disc (CD), the digital video disc (DVD).

But simply being able to use technology in new ways and new ways wasn’t enough for the company. It wanted to be a global brand and support the idea that technology would improve people’s lives. To this end, Philips launched a new branding called “Let’s make things better”, which emphasized improving people’s lives through technological solutions. The company launched the campaign globally in all markets and linked the campaign to all its products. It also united the entire company, gave employees a sense of belonging, and unified the company for an external audience. The main goal of the campaign was to help Philips connect with people, and it succeeded in this endeavour.

Nevertheless, the business community was concerned that the campaign did not reflect the efficiency or technical superiority of its products. To identify consumer trends, Philips conducted market research surveys of more than 1,650 consumers and 180 companies that were Philips customers worldwide and also surveyed 26,000 respondents to measure consumption the role exactly. The focus groups and questionnaires (a) helped the Philips brand identify and evaluate new ways forward, and (b) enabled the company to better understand the current market. The results showed that customers believe that Philips products are “trustworthy,” and that the company lives up to its quality promise.

The company also found that its core target group was well-educated and successful decision-makers between the ages of 35 and 55. This group was generally unhappy with the unnecessary disruption of technology new often brought about and valued simplicity and general efficiency In order to get the work done, they were marginalized by the need to read and hear books that were hard down before testing their new products Philips recycled these words by rebranding itself: the new campaign is called “Sense and Simplicity”. Turning the focus to the benefits of easy-to-understand technology, this design remains characteristic of everything Philips produces and reflects the company’s market-driven attitude, meaning everything is designed to meet customer needs and customer insight management.

The “sense and simplicity” campaign was based on three areas – firstly, products are designed around the customer; Second, it’s easy to experience; and third, forward. Philips continues to innovate based on these three areas, and new brands that communicate its brand positioning through advertising that targets the core group with relevant and appealing products have been successful. In 2014, Inter Brand’s annual ranking showed a 5 percent increase in overall brand value, the 11th highest increase in most years. Before the launch of the new campaign in 2004, the total was estimated at $4.4 billion; In 2014, it more than doubled to $10.264 billion.

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